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Bursitis in my Knee :(

December 28, 2009 Leave a comment

I did an intense cleaning session at the restaurant that I’m the Chef at and it required a lot of kneeling and vacuuming, about 2 weeks ago.  I think all of the kneeling set off some irritation in my left knee and now when I run over 30 minutes I get this inflamation just below kneecap and slightly to the inside of my leg.   The good thing is, it is not painful.  I have read up on bursitis of the knee, and there are several bursa sacs in the knee.  My particular problem is called

Pes anserinus bursitis

Bursa in the Knee

The remedy is R.I.C.E, (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) so I’ve been taking it easy and doing cross training on the bike and elliptical and running a little less.

Plus, Ice and compression combined with topical NSAID like Traumeel or MSM cream.

Nutritional Supplements can also be very effective at reducing inflamation and may be a better long term solution to controlling the bursitis or arthritis.

Nutrition and Supplements

Eat whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fatty fish or help reduce inflammation. Avoid processed foods and foods high in sugar and fat. The following supplements may help.

(excerpt taken from University of Maryland Medical Center

Pes Anserine Bursitis Treatment Options for a P.T.

· Have patient refrain from activities which increase symptoms

· Ice Massage/Ice Packs

· Postural Training/Functional Training

· ROM/Stretching

· Strengthening

· Massage/Soft Tissue Mobilization

· Joint Mobilization

· Gait Training

· Orthotics

· Ultrasound/Phonophoresis/Iontophoresis

There is a good site about bursitis at bursitis.org

I’m pretty sure that the kneeling episode set it off, but only combined with my high mileage, and poor mechanics on my left leg.  So I am working on stregthening my lower left leg.  Also the rolfing sessions are helping with proper mechanics.

On a “lighter” note…the Christmas season was great but not an ideal setting for losing weight.  Yeah, I put on a couple pounds, but I’m still much lighter than I was at this time last year, by about 10 lbs.  My favorite thing to do after the Holidays is the 5-day Reset, which is a nutritional based weight loss system made by a company that I work with and use.

5 Day RESET Kit

I was 194 this morning before I went to the gym…not good.  I’ll keep you updated on my 5 day results.

I also registered for my first triathlon, albeit an INDOOR tri, I’m excited.  I’m a little worried about the swim though, I haven’t swam for speed in, well, never.  I’ve swam laps before when I was younger, like 20 years ago.  Oh well, you gotta start somewhere right?  I will try to get in a pool before the Jan. 10th event, but it may not happen.  It’s only a 10 minute swim, then 30 min on the bike, then 20 min on the treadmill.  I’ve always wanted to get into Tri’s since I feel like my body type is more suited to that than it is to long distance running.  We’ll see where I stack up with very little training 🙂

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Rolfing

December 21, 2009 5 comments

I had my second rolfing session yesterday.  I had rolfing on my list of things to do for about a year now.  It was actually recommended to me by my massage therapist.  The only thing holding me back was my lack of knowledge of what it was, and the time commitment.  Most reports say that for rolfing to be effective you should go through 10 sessions.

So far, so good.  The results of my 1st 2 sessions have been fantastic.  The first session focused mainly on my upper back, shoulders, and arms.  Then 10 days later on my 1st long run of the winter, I went 11 miles easy in 90 minutes.  As my run was coming to an end, I took a physical inventory of my body and realized I felt good…dare I say great.  I could have run another 30 minutes no problem.  And amazingly, my upperback which gets sore like clockwork after about 60 minutes of running was almost pain free.  Infinetely better then it has been, usually after a 90 minute + run I can’t turn my head to the side without my upper back screaming from tightness.  Needless to say, I was impressed and attributed my pain free run to rolfing since that was the only change I had made.  Nice.

The second session focused on legs, mainly lower legs, but whole leg was worked on.

After every session I get “homework”, which is basically what I need to do to help the progress last.  My 2 homeworks so far are things I know I should do but don’t because they aren’t fun.

1.  Rolling my IT band with a foam roller, ouch

2. Strengthening my weak calf that had the ruptured Achilles

But she is right…those are necessary for me to get faster and stay healthy

Let me explain what rolfing is,  better yet, let wikipedia explain Rolfing.

Basically it is myofacial release  Here is the Rolf Institutes explantion of rolfing and how it differs from massage

Rolfing and Massage

What is the difference between massage and Rolfing?

Rolfing is not a form of massage
One of the most common misconceptions about Rolfing is that it is a nothing more than a type of very deep massage. There are many varieties of massage, which are particularly effective for loosening tight tissue, reducing stress, detoxing the body and an increased feeling of relaxation and well-being. Since these benefits are also a byproduct of Rolfing, the general public experience confusion as to the precise difference between our work and the proliferation of effective touch modalities currently available.

Rolfing balances the body in gravity
Ray McCall, an Advanced Rolfer in Boulder and former student of Dr. Rolf, once said that what Rolfers do can be summed up in three words: palpation, discrimination and integration.

  • We palpate, or touch the tissue, feeling for imbalances in tissue texture, quality and temperature to determine where we need to work.
  • We discriminate, or separate fascial layers that adhere and muscles that have been pulled out of position by strain or injury.
  • Finally, we integrate the body, relating its segments in an improved relationship, bringing physical balance in the gravitational field.

Other soft-tissue manipulation methods, including massage, are quite good at the first two, but do not balance the body in gravity.

Rolfing reshapes and reorganizes
As Dr. Rolf used to say: “Anyone can take a body apart, very few know how to put it back together.” The true genius of her method is the art and science of reshaping and reorganizing human structure according to clearly defined principles in a systematic and consistent manner.

Rolfing can teach you to help yourself function more effectively
In addition to our skill as structural integrators, Rolfers are also educators, a point Dr. Rolf stressed frequently in her training classes.

The role of teacher is something every Rolfer takes seriously. In each session, Rolfers seek to impart insights to clients to increase their awareness and understanding, to help the client make the work we do their own. Our job is to make ourselves obsolete, by empowering our clients to take charge of their own physical and emotional health. Influencing the structural evolution of man on a global level was Dr. Rolf’s fondest dream.

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